Business Cloud News
FeaturesRSS

IoT security and the world of US medicine

IoT in healthcare faces its fair share of challenges

Of all the sectors where IoT is proliferating, however, it is arguably medical that is the most fraught. In medical IT, developers have to operate in a minefield of intense regulation, life and death safety issues, and an unusually high (and of course very much unwelcome) degree of scrutiny from hackers.

Hybrid cloud issues are cultural first, technical second – Ovum

CIOs are still struggling with their hybrid cloud strategies

This week has seen a number of hybrid cloud deals which would suggest the industry is making significant progress delivering the platforms, services and tools necessary to make hybrid cloud practical. But if anything they also serve as a reminder that IT will forever be multimodal which creates challenges that begin with people, not technology, explains Ovum’s principle analyst of infrastructure solutions Roy Illsley.

Exclusive: How Virgin Active is getting fit with the Internet of Things

Virgin want to use IoT to make its service more holistic and improve customer retention

Virgin Active is embarking on an ambitious redesign of its facilities that uses the Internet of Things to improve the service it offers to customers and reduce subscriber attrition rates, explains Andy Caddy, chief information officer of Virgin Active.

Food retail, robotics, cloud and the Internet of Things

Ocado is developing a white-label grocery delivery service

With a varied and fast moving supply chain, loads of stock moving quickly through warehouses, delivery trucks, stores, and an increasingly digital mandate, the food retail sector is unlike any other retail segment. Paul Clarke, director of technology at Ocado, a leading online food retailer, explains how the cloud, robotics, and the Internet of Things is increasingly at the heart of everything the company does.

Real-time cloud monitoring too challenging for most providers, TFL tech lead says

Reed says TFL wants to encourage greater greater use of its data

Getting solid data on what’s happening in your application in real-time seems to be a fairly big challenge for most cloud services providers out there explains Simon Reed, head of bus systems & technology at Transport for London (TFL).

Bring Your Own Encryption: The case for standards

BYOE is the new black

Being free to choose the most suitable encryption for your business seems like a good idea. But it will only work in a context of recognised standards across encryption systems and providers’ security platforms. Since the start of the 21st century, security has emerged from scare-story status to become one of IT users’ biggest issues – as survey after survey confirms. Along the way a number of uncomfortable lessons are still being learned.

Mark Evans, head of IT at RLB on BYOD, hybrid cloud, and standards

Mark Evans

As we approach Cloud World Forum in London this June BCN had the opportunity to catch up with one of the conference speakers, Mark Evans, head of IT at global property and construction practice Rider Levett Bucknall (RLB) to discuss supporting BYOD, the need for standards in the cloud sector and the impact of working with large data models on the technology choices the firm has to make.

Cloud democratises retail investor services

Cloud has the potential to democratize investment services

Cloud services are opening up possibilities for the retail investor to create individual customised funds in a way that was previously the preserve of the super-wealthy. Coupled with UK regulation such as the Retail Distribution Review, the effect has been to make new business models possible, according to Michael Newell, chief executive at InvestYourWay.

The cloud beyond x86: How old architectures are making a comeback

x86 i undeniably the king of datacentre compute architecture, but there's good reason to believe old architectures are making a comeback

When you ask IT pros to think of cloud the first thing that often comes to mind is web-delivered, meter-billed virtualised compute (and increasingly storage and networking) environments which, today, tends to imply an x86-centric stack built to serve up mostly any workload. But anyone watching this space closely will see x86 isn’t the only kid on the block, with SPARC, ARM and Power all vying for a large chunk of the scale-out market, as enterprises seek to squeeze more power out of their cloud hardware. What will the cloud stack of tomorrow look like?

Why did anyone think HP was in it for public cloud?

HP president and chief executive officer Meg Whitman (right) is leading HP's largest restructuring ever

Many have jumped on a recently published interview with Bill Hilf, the head of HP’s cloud business, as a sign HP is finally coming to terms with its inability to make a dent in Amazon’s public cloud business. But what had me scratching my head is not that HP would so blatantly seem to cede ground in this segment – but why many assume it wanted to in the first place.

@BizCloud
News