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IT pros are buying cloud services from too many vendors, adding unnecessary complexity, Telstra claims

IT pros are buying cloud services from too many vendors, adding unnecessary complexity, Telstra claims

Enterprises are buying their cloud services from too many vendors, which is creating unnecessary complexity and slowing time to market, according to recently published research from Australian telco Telstra.

A report commissioned by Telstra which surveyed 675 IT decision makers from multinational organisations in the US, UK, Singapore, Hong Kong, and Australia suggests 72 per cent of IT decision makers would prefer a single provider or broker for all of their cloud services rather than go through the challenge of managing multiple vendors.

But a majority of respondents claimed to contract with at least three vendors for their cloud services, something Telstra said adds unnecessary complexity when integrating and running those services.

“We are living in a buyers’ market and our research suggests that in an effort to satisfy diverse customer expectations, many businesses initially turn to multiple cloud vendors to meet their various infrastructure needs. The result can be a complex cloud environment that is hard for the business to manage, integrate and control,” said Martin Bishop, head of network, applications & services, Telstra Global Enterprise & Services, the enterprise IT-focused subsidiary of the Australian telecoms giant.

“Despite this, our research also reveals that pooling resources into a single private cloud isn’t the ideal end-state either, with the majority of IT decision makers arguing this model fails to deliver the flexibility required for the varying types of processes, services and workloads that global companies must support.”

“Many organisations today want the capability to host data offshore to support business growth and as evidenced in our research, see value in working with providers who are familiar with the various regulation, governance and legal considerations across the multiple markets they operate in,” Bishop added.

The report also show adoption of infrastructure-as-a-service also varies widely by industry, with manufacturing (61 per cent), professional services (54 per cent), and the finance and insurance sectors (46 per cent) most likely to be using the technology. The higher education sector has been the least likely to adopt IaaS, with more than a quarter (27 per cent) having no implementation plans at this stage.

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