Business Cloud News
Surprisingly few UK MPs claim to have a good understanding of the forthcoming EU data protection reforms, the most significant overhaul to data protection rules on the continent in decades

Surprisingly few UK MPs claim to have a good understanding of the forthcoming EU data protection reforms

A recent study surveying what UK parliamentarians think about cloud computing reveals that while most MPs believe data offshoring and security are key barriers to cloud uptake in the public sector, surprisingly few MPs – just three per cent – claim to have a good understanding of the upcoming European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

While the research shows most MPs support G-Cloud (85 per cent) and are calling for more widespread use of cloud services in the public sector (82 per cent), many (57 per cent) believe data the greatest obstacle facing cloud adoption across government is data offshoring.

An overwhelming majority (97 per cent) of MPs agreed that the UK provides adequate protection for processing public data.

But while these results seem to indicate that UK parliamentarians take data privacy and protection issues seriously, just 3 per cent of MPs claimed that they have a good understanding of the upcoming European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), highlighting a troubling discrepancy.

“G-Cloud is a good news story for any politician, given the huge progress that has been made in delivering better public services for less, while creating a more open and transparent marketplace for all,” said Simon Hansford, chief executive officer of Skyscape Cloud Services.

“Concerns about offshoring affecting the security of data are valid and timely given recent media and political focus on this issue.  G-Cloud buyers are currently required to identify the location where their data will be processed and stored, and to understand the jurisdictional and legal implications in order to make an informed risk assessment,” Hansford said.

The UK Cabinet Office did not responded to requests for comment at the time of writing.

The GDPR, which replaces the EU Data Protection Act of 1995, brings more stringent requirements on data processors and handlers like cloud providers, including increased fines for breaches of data protection laws that could cost firms up to 5 per cent of global turnover, up to €100,000,000, and aims to harmonise how data protection laws are implemented across the 28 EU member states.

The new rules, viewed by many as the largest overhaul of EU laws governing data protection in over 20 years, are likely to come into effect in 2017

The survey results suggest MPs are in the same state many UK IT professionals have found themselves in with respect to the impending legal overhauls. A recently published survey of 850 senior IT decision makers across Europe revealed 50 per cent of the British ITDMs polled were “completely unaware” of the impending regulation.

@BizCloud
News