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The OpenStack Marketplace aims to help simplify user adoption of cloud services, and help them make sense of the growing OpenStack ecosystem

The OpenStack Marketplace aims to help simplify user adoption of cloud services, and help them make sense of the growing OpenStack ecosystem

The OpenStack Foundation announced the launch of Marketplace this week, an online catalogue of OpenStack-based products and services to help navigate the growing OpenStack ecosystem. Jonathan Bryce, executive director of the OpenStack Foundation said the catalogue will help clear up much confusion users encounter along the path to adoption.

The OpenStack Marketplace was announced at the OpenStack Foundation Summit in Atlanta, Georgia this week, and extends the organisation’s previous efforts to launch a training-focused digital marketplace.

It will include public cloud services, distributions and appliances, consulting and system integration and drivers on offer from a range of contributing vendors; each piece of technology listed on the marketplace will have to conform to a strict set of characteristics in order to ensure a minimum level of compatibility and quality of use.

Dell, Canonical, HP, The Linux Foundation, SUSE, Red Hat, IBM, Mirantis and Rackspace are among the vendors and organisations with solutions listed in the marketplace at launch.

Bryce also used the Summit to beat the drums of coopetition, a defining characteristic of the OpenStack effort.

“OpenStack is kindof like a farmer’s market in a way,” Bryce said. “You can buy things in different formats: you can get ingredients to make your meals, pre-made meals, you’re going to make a choice between those options. But at some level those vendors that participate have a common goal… that’s really what we see in OpenStack.”

“Our companies compete but they also collaborate to build the best technologies for the benefit of the whole industry,” he said.

Ultimately, the OpenStack Foundation (and participating vendors) hopes marketplace will help clear up confusion that often surrounds the open source platform. With a range of new features and sub-projects constantly being launched and integrated into emerging releases it has been difficult – even, at times, for vendors – to get a clear sense of OpenStack’s identity (more specifically, what it does and does not do).

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