Business Cloud News
SAP rolled out HANA as a cloud service Thursday, including an application ecosystem and platform as a service placing HANA at the heart of new applications

SAP rolled out HANA as a cloud service Thursday, including an application ecosystem and platform as a service placing HANA at the heart of those  apps

German software company SAP announced Thursday that  it is offering cloud subscription pricing models for its in-memory computing platform, SAP HANA, and will start offering an application ecosystem built atop the platform. SAP executive board member and innovation head Vishal Sikka said the move was a response to the changing ways even the most persistent databases and high-capacity computing services are consumed today.

The company said it plans to roll out SAP HANA platform on a monthly subscription basis, cutting down some of the cost of consuming the service. The cloud platform will be offered in 128GB to 1TB configurations with 40 cores each, ranging from about $1,595 to $6,495 per month, respectively.

SAP also announced an application marketplace for the in-memory platform, and a platform as a service to enable customers to more quickly build custom applications using the in-memory platform as an engine.

“Today, we are simplifying access and expanding the market reach for SAP’s breakthrough SAP HANA platform,” said Sikka.

“With these steps, customers and partners can experience the power of SAP HANA and build amazing applications in any way they choose to chart new frontiers in cloud-based software without compromise.”

Software services, it would seem, is where SAP intends to generate most of the revenue from HANA moving forward. For instance, the Database as a Service built on top of HANA with a 1TB configuration would cost an eye-watering $83,295 per month. With those kinds of sums being thrown around it will be interesting to see how quickly the company surpasses the €1bn HANA-generated revenue target it set for itself two years ago.

Sikka said in a webcast press conference that the move demonstrates how the German software company is changing to meet increasingly popular methods of consuming IT services.

“We’ve gone from a high-touch sales process where a bus full of people shows up and sells you something, to where you buy things everywhere,” he said.

@BizCloud
News