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IBM and Akamai say the services developed through the partnership will help businesses monitor their networks for DDoS attacks

IBM and Akamai say the services developed through the partnership will help businesses monitor their networks for DDoS attacks

IBM and Akamai, a company specialising in wrapping security provisions around content delivery networks outlined plans Tuesday to partner on the development of a cloud service that helps businesses identify network anomalies and stop distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks in their tracks.

As part of the agreement IBM will integrate Akamai’s Kona Site Defender, a network and application layer detection service, with its cloud security services portfolio. The two companies will also share security intelligence and work together to develop plans for businesses to monitor, respond to and mitigate DDoS on their cloud-based applications and services.

“Our clients tell us there is a need to strengthen cloud security,” Kris Lovejoy, IBM Security Services General Manager. “The partnership with Akamai combines a world-class security team and an intelligent network platform to strengthen cloud security. Together with Akamai, IBM can provide both proactive and reactive DDoS protection from the increasing frequency, scale and sophistication of these attacks,” he added.

DDoS attacks are when hackers attempt to infiltrate or disrupt a service by flooding the network and overloading the servers with requests until they shut down.

The approach was used more recently by The Syrian Electronic Army as it attempted to bring down a number of US-based digital publications including New York Times website this Summer.

This technique and approach is becoming more sophisticated and more frequent. By Akamai’s count the average large company must filter 1,400 cyber attacks a week, and in 2013 the enterprise sector continued to be the leading target of DDoS attacks, followed by commerce media and Entertainment, high tech and the public sector. The company estimates these attacks are costing businesses up to $1 million annually once downtime and associated costs are taken into account.

In related news, Google just launched a website tracking DDoS attack traffic globally which gives one a sense of where these attacks are coming from (and which countries are being targeted).

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